Moshe Barlev Chinese medicine healer Acupuncture, Herbs, nutrition Qi-Kong Tuina Tai Chi teacher.

 

 Lack of Iodine 

In the entire western world most people do not  get the sufficient amount of Iodine per day. Since the 1960s, theAmerican FDA recommends weconsume 40 micrograms of Iodine per day. Recent studies showthat a minimum of 400 micrograms per day is required. This is 10 times more then officially advised by the FDA!

 

There are researchers and doctors that advise amount of 4000 micrograms daily.

Research shows that lack of Iodine in women is the main reason for Breast cancer and Cervical cancer (there located small amount of Iodine).

Lack of Iodine is also the main reason forprostatecancer in men.

Lack of Iodine is the source for most of the metabolic diseases such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, ALS, MS, fibromyalgia, obesity and all the diseases related obesity and Hypothyroid.

Why doesn't a thyroid blood test (TSH and F4) reflect the situation?

The good boundariesof any blood tests is done as Gaussian distributions of all people when the good boundaries are from 10 % to 90%.

Since all the population sufferedfor over fourdecades from lack of Iodine, everyone should have some kind of a problem intheirthyroid.

The main Iodine source in our nutrition is Seaweed.Due to the fact that most of the western world do not eat Seaweedon a regular basis (Nuri seaweed, used in Sushi roles, is low in Iodine), I recommend each one to take KELP computing everyday.

**in case of Thyroid disease please consult your doctor**

http://www.iodine4health.com/disease/disease.htm

http://theiodineproject.webs.com/cancerandiodine.htm

Thyroid hormone Production

 

 

IODINE AND DISEASE

http://www.iodine4health.com/disease/disease.htm

 

There is increasing evidence that iodine deficiency is related to a variety of disease conditions.

 

Thyroid Disease.

Iodine deficiency is directly connected with numerous thyroid diseases, including hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, goiter, autoimmune issues, and cancer.  There is a great deal of controversy over what effects iodine has on these conditions.  The amount of iodine appears to be critical, with either too little or too much iodine having undesirable effects.  At this point, there is strong disagreement about how much iodine is optimal.

 

Cancer.

Iodine deficiency is strongly implicated in cancer including thyroid cancer, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, prostate cancer, stomach cancer, pancreatic cancer, colon cancer, and lung cancer.   Researchers have been investigating molecular iodine (I2), apoptosis, NIS gene insertion, DNA methylation, and various other mechanisms that may be involved in various stages of cancer development and treatment.

 

Heart Disease.

Cann has hypothesized that iodine deficiency can have deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system, and correspondingly, that a higher iodine intake may benefit cardiovascular function.  Thyroid hormones (T4, T3, and probably also T2, and T1) are important to the heart.

 

Multiple Sclerosis 

Multiple Sclerosis belongs to a family of diseases that seem to be linked to iodine and selenium deficiency.  Thyroid hormones are connected with re-myelination.

 

Diabetes 

Diabetes is an autoimmune disease, with links to the thyroid autoimmune diseases.  Flechas discusses conditions under which iodine is likely to be useful in the treatment of diabetes.

 

Aids

It is possible that iodine is effective in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus and AIDS-associated opportunistic infections.

 

Lupus.  An article from 1913 discusses nascent iodine for lupus.

 

Lyme Disease.

Iodine has been advocated for the treatment of Lyme Disease.

 

Sjogren's Syndrome 

Sjogren's Syndrome is closely related to the thyroid autoimmune diseases and may have other links to iodine.

 

 

The research on iodine and disease is in its early stages with much speculation. There is still a great deal of controversy about which forms of iodine are best in which disease conditions and how much iodine is too much. Still, a great deal has been learned.

 

Obviously, this is a research and educational website.  We are not giving medical advice.  This web site is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.  Please find a qualified health practitioner for personal consultation on any disease condition.

 

 

 

[Iodine deficiency: current situation and future prospects].

[Article in French]

De Benoist BDelange F.

Département de nutrition pour la santé et le développement, Organisation mondiale de la santé, CH 1211 Genève 27, Suisse. debenoist@who.ch

Abstract

Iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) is a major public health problem worldwide. WHO estimates that 740 million people are currently affected by goitre. The consequences of iodine deficiency on health are the results of hypothyroidism and the main one is impaired development of foetal brain. IDD is the first cause of preventable brain damage in children. The recommended strategy to correct IDD rests upon salt iodisation. Over the last 20 years, the international community mobilised to eliminate IDD under the leadership of WHO, Unicef and ICCIDD. It resulted in remarkable progress in IDD control, especially in Africa and in South East Asia where the endemic is the most severe. It is estimated that 68% of the populations of affected countries have currently access to iodised salt. However, out of the 130 affected countries, about 30 have no programme. Besides, salt quality control and monitoring of population iodine status are still weak in many countries, thus exposing the population to an excessive iodine intake and subsequently to the risk of iodine-induced hyperthyroidism. In addition, IDD is re-emerging in some countries, especially in Eastern Europe after it had disappeared. In order to reach the goal of IDD elimination, it is important to insist on the sustainability of salt iodisation programmes, which implies an increased commitment of both health authorities and representatives of the salt industry.

 

 

IODINE IS VITAL FOR GOOD HEALTH

 

 

 

By Dr. James Howenstine, MD.
November 5, 2005
NewsWithViews.com

Lack of iodine is widespread in the United States today. For many years iodine was added to bread in generous quantities which prevented iodine deficiency. Each slice of bread contained 150 mcg. of iodine filling the whole days RDA of iodine In 1960 the average diet consumed about 1 mg. of iodine daily with bakery products accounting for about 75 % of the total. This quantity of iodine was enough to decrease the thyroid glands ability to absorb radioactive iodine and it was also sufficient to prevent excess release of thyroid hormone thus preventing many cases of hyperthyroidism (Grave’s Disease).

Forty years ago the food industry decided to remove iodine from baked goods and replace the iodine with bromine. Iodine and bromine appear similar to the thyroid gland and bromine easily binds to the thyroid gland’s receptors for iodine. Bromine, however, is of no value to the thyroid gland unlike iodine and itinhibits the activity of iodine in the thyroid gland.Bromine also can cause impaired thinking and memory, drowsiness, dizziness and irritability. This substitution of bromine for iodine has resulted in nearly universal deficiency of iodine in the American populace. Iodine therapy helps the body eliminate fluoride, bromine, lead, cadmium, arsenic, aluminum and mercury. Could this substitution of bromine for iodine have been carried out to increase diseases and thus create more need for pharmaceutical drugs?

Among the problems caused by iodine deficiency are:

  • Dr. Abrahams recommends taking 50 mg of Iodoral (four 12.5 mg. tablets), Lugol’s solution (8 drops)or Triodide (8 drops) daily for 3 months as a loading dose. Then this dose should be gradually reduced to the 12.5 mg. maintenance dosage under the supervision of a knowledgeable health care professional. Dr.Abraham feels that 14 to 15 mg. of iodine/iodide daily is the upper maximum of safety. This is close to the recommended dose of 12.5 mg daily so caution is necessary in managing iodine repletion. Japanese researchers have discovered patients with hypothyroidism who were taking 20 mg. of iodine or more daily.

 

 

 
 

 Iodine: the Next Vitamin D?

by Lara Pizzorno, MDiv, MA, LMT

Part I: Americans at High Risk for Iodine Insufficiency

 

Abstract

Despite the widely held assumption that Americans are iodine-sufficient due to the availability of iodized salt, the U.S. population is actually at high risk for iodine insufficiency. Iodine intake has been decreasing in the U.S. since the early 70s as a result of changes in Americans' food and dietary habits, including the facts that iodized salt is infrequently used in restaurant and processed foods, and iodized salt sold for home use may provide far less than the amount of iodine listed on the container's label. The widespread dispersal of perchlorate, nitrate and thiocyanate (competitive inhibitors of iodide uptake) in the environment blocks absorption of the little iodine Americans do consume, further compounding the problem.

In adults, iodine is necessary not only for the production of thyroid hormones, thus affecting systemic metabolism, but is now recognized to play a protective role against fibrocystic breast disease and breast cancer. In addition, a relationship has been hypothesized between iodine deficiency and a number of other health issues including other malignancies, obesity, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), psychiatric disorders, and fibromyalgia.

Analogous to the case of vitamin D, a nutrient for which the 400 IU RDI, although capable of preventing rickets, has been proven inadequate for this pro-hormone's numerous other functions in the body, the iodine RDI for adults of 150 mcg/day (220 mcg/day for pregnant women), while sufficient to prevent goiter (and cretinism), is inadequate for the promotion of optimal fetal brain development or optimal health in adults. Intake of 3-6 mg/day, an amount commonly consumed in Japan without increased incidence of autoimmune thyroiditis or hypothyroidism, may be necessary to support not only thyroid hormone production, but iodine's important antioxidant functions in the breast and other tissues in which this trace mineral is concentrated.

Part I of this article discusses the numerous factors that place Americans at high risk for iodine insufficiency. Part II reviews iodine's roles in the body, the relationship of iodine insufficiency to the above mentioned pathologies, available options in laboratory assessments of iodine levels, optimal intake, preferential forms of supplementation, and cofactors necessary for optimal iodine utilization. 

 

 

Iodine: the Next Vitamin D?

by Lara Pizzorno, MDiv, MA, LMT and Chris Meletis, ND

Part II: Not Just for Thyroid

Abstract

Despite the widely held assumption that Americans are iodine-sufficient due to the availability of iodized salt, the U.S. population is actually at high risk for iodine insufficiency. Iodine intake has been decreasing in the U.S. since the early 70s as a result of changes in Americans' food and dietary habits, including the facts that iodized salt is infrequently used in restaurant and processed foods, and iodized salt sold for home use may provide far less than the amount of iodine listed on the container's label. The widespread dispersal of perchlorate, nitrate and thiocyanate (competitive inhibitors of iodide uptake) in the environment blocks absorption of the little iodine Americans do consume, further compounding the problem.

In adults, iodine is necessary not only for the production of thyroid hormones, thus affecting systemic metabolism, but is now recognized to play a protective role against fibrocystic breast disease and breast cancer. In addition, a relationship has been hypothesized between iodine deficiency and a number of other health issues including other malignancies, obesity, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), psychiatric disorders, and fibromyalgia.

Analogous to the case of vitamin D, a nutrient for which the 400 IU DRI, although capable of preventing rickets, has been proven inadequate for this pro-hormone's numerous other functions in the body, the iodine DRI for adults of 150 mcg/day (220 mcg/day for pregnant women), while sufficient to prevent goiter (and cretinism), is inadequate for the promotion of optimal health in adults or optimal fetal brain development. Intake of 3-6 mg/day, an amount commonly consumed in Japan without increased incidence of autoimmune thyroiditis or hypothyroidism, may be necessary to support not only thyroid hormone production, but iodine's important antioxidant functions in the breast and other tissues in which this trace mineral is concentrated.

Part I of this article discusses the numerous factors that place Americans at high risk for iodine insufficiency. Part II reviews iodine's roles in the body, the relationship of iodine insufficiency to the above mentioned pathologies, available options in laboratory assessments of iodine levels, optimal intake, preferential forms of supplementation, and cofactors necessary for optimal iodine utilization.

 

 


Iodine: the Next Vitamin D?

by Lara Pizzorno, MDiv, MA, LMT and Chris Meletis, ND

Part II: Not Just for Thyroid

Abstract

Despite the widely held assumption that Americans are iodine-sufficient due to the availability of iodized salt, the U.S. population is actually at high risk for iodine insufficiency. Iodine intake has been decreasing in the U.S. since the early 70s as a result of changes in Americans' food and dietary habits, including the facts that iodized salt is infrequently used in restaurant and processed foods, and iodized salt sold for home use may provide far less than the amount of iodine listed on the container's label. The widespread dispersal of perchlorate, nitrate and thiocyanate (competitive inhibitors of iodide uptake) in the environment blocks absorption of the little iodine Americans do consume, further compounding the problem.

In adults, iodine is necessary not only for the production of thyroid hormones, thus affecting systemic metabolism, but is now recognized to play a protective role against fibrocystic breast disease and breast cancer. In addition, a relationship has been hypothesized between iodine deficiency and a number of other health issues including other malignancies, obesity, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), psychiatric disorders, and fibromyalgia.

Analogous to the case of vitamin D, a nutrient for which the 400 IU DRI, although capable of preventing rickets, has been proven inadequate for this pro-hormone's numerous other functions in the body, the iodine DRI for adults of 150 mcg/day (220 mcg/day for pregnant women), while sufficient to prevent goiter (and cretinism), is inadequate for the promotion of optimal health in adults or optimal fetal brain development. Intake of 3-6 mg/day, an amount commonly consumed in Japan without increased incidence of autoimmune thyroiditis or hypothyroidism, may be necessary to support not only thyroid hormone production, but iodine's important antioxidant functions in the breast and other tissues in which this trace mineral is concentrated.

Part I of this article discusses the numerous factors that place Americans at high risk for iodine insufficiency. Part II reviews iodine's roles in the body, the relationship of iodine insufficiency to the above mentioned pathologies, available options in laboratory assessments of iodine levels, optimal intake, preferential forms of supplementation, and cofactors necessary for optimal iodine utilization